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What used to be a site full of reblogged posts has turned into a site that consists of reblogs and angsty rants that are otherwise too long for twitter and too embarrassing for Facebook

Posts tagged astronomy

May 30 '12
kqedscience:

Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit took photos of star trails, terrestrial lights, airglow and auroras while aboard the International Space Station. Image taken April 5, 2012.

kqedscience:

Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit took photos of star trails, terrestrial lights, airglow and auroras while aboard the International Space Station. Image taken April 5, 2012.

May 18 '12
scanzen:

A Népligetben átadták a TIT planetáriumát. A huszonhárom méter átmérőjű kupolára az égitestek mozgását, csillagászati és meteorológiai jelenségeket lehet vetíteni. 1977. augusztus 17. MTI Fotó: Csikós Gábor.Projection in the dome of the Budapest Planetarium, 1977.

scanzen:

A Népligetben átadták a TIT planetáriumát. A huszonhárom méter átmérőjű kupolára az égitestek mozgását, csillagászati és meteorológiai jelenségeket lehet vetíteni. 1977. augusztus 17. MTI Fotó: Csikós Gábor.

Projection in the dome of the Budapest Planetarium, 1977.

Apr 15 '12
Apr 9 '12
kqedscience:

At the End of the Earth, Seeking Clues to the Universe
Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array being installed, 16,597 feet above sea level.

kqedscience:

At the End of the Earth, Seeking Clues to the Universe

Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array being installed, 16,597 feet above sea level.

Mar 25 '12
expose-the-light:

Two Moons In Passing
In the image: Animation of Tethys passing in front of Dione from Cassini’s point of view.
Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Pretty cool!
Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers (660 miles) wide and 1,123 kilometers (698 miles) wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.
In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km (250 miles) across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.
The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.
If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.
Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI. Animation by Jason Major.

expose-the-light:

Two Moons In Passing

In the image: Animation of Tethys passing in front of Dione from Cassini’s point of view.

Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Pretty cool!

Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers (660 miles) wide and 1,123 kilometers (698 miles) wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.

In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km (250 miles) across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.

The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.

If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.

Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI. Animation by Jason Major.

(Source: )

Mar 5 '12
ikenbot:

LIDAR & The Milky Way above Innsbruck

by Christoph Malin

The LIDAR (DIAL) Laser System of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at the Schneefernerhaus Research Station below the Zugspitze Peak.

ikenbot:

LIDAR & The Milky Way above Innsbruck

by Christoph Malin

The LIDAR (DIAL) Laser System of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at the Schneefernerhaus Research Station below the Zugspitze Peak.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

Mar 5 '12
Mar 4 '12
ulaulaman:

Merging Galaxy Cluster Abell 520
This composite image shows the distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and hot gas in the core of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 520, formed from a violent collision of massive galaxy clusters.
The natural-color image of the galaxies was taken with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii.
Superimposed on the image are “false-colored” maps showing the concentration of starlight, hot gas, and dark matter in the cluster. Starlight from galaxies, derived from observations by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, is colored orange. The green-tinted regions show hot gas, as detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. The gas is evidence that a collision took place. The blue-colored areas pinpoint the location of most of the mass in the cluster, which is dominated by dark matter. Dark matter is an invisible substance that makes up most of the universe’s mass. The dark-matter map was derived from the Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations by detecting how light from distant objects is distorted by the cluster of galaxies, an effect called gravitational lensing.
The blend of blue and green in the center of the image reveals that a clump of dark matter resides near most of the hot gas, where very few galaxies are found. This finding confirms previous observations of a dark-matter core in the cluster. The result could present a challenge to basic theories of dark matter, which predict that galaxies should be anchored to dark matter, even during the shock of a collision.
Abell 520 resides 2.4 billion light-years away.
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CFHT, CXO, M.J. Jee (University of California, Davis), and A. Mahdavi (San Francisco State University)

ulaulaman:

Merging Galaxy Cluster Abell 520

This composite image shows the distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and hot gas in the core of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 520, formed from a violent collision of massive galaxy clusters.
The natural-color image of the galaxies was taken with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii.
Superimposed on the image are “false-colored” maps showing the concentration of starlight, hot gas, and dark matter in the cluster. Starlight from galaxies, derived from observations by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, is colored orange. The green-tinted regions show hot gas, as detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. The gas is evidence that a collision took place. The blue-colored areas pinpoint the location of most of the mass in the cluster, which is dominated by dark matter. Dark matter is an invisible substance that makes up most of the universe’s mass. The dark-matter map was derived from the Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations by detecting how light from distant objects is distorted by the cluster of galaxies, an effect called gravitational lensing.
The blend of blue and green in the center of the image reveals that a clump of dark matter resides near most of the hot gas, where very few galaxies are found. This finding confirms previous observations of a dark-matter core in the cluster. The result could present a challenge to basic theories of dark matter, which predict that galaxies should be anchored to dark matter, even during the shock of a collision.
Abell 520 resides 2.4 billion light-years away.
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CFHT, CXO, M.J. Jee (University of California, Davis), and A. Mahdavi (San Francisco State University)
Feb 29 '12
expose-the-light:

Going Boom
Photograph courtesy NASA
Russian   cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov are seen during a   spacewalk on February 16 as they work on maintenance and upgrades for   the International Space Station.
During   the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, the pair worked on a telescoping   boom—used to move massive components outside the station—that’s being   prepared for replacement next year.
The  cosmonauts also installed  a new science experiment on the outside of  the station and collected a  sample from the insulation on the Zvezda  service module to check for  any biological contamination.

expose-the-light:

Going Boom

Photograph courtesy NASA

Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anton Shkaplerov are seen during a spacewalk on February 16 as they work on maintenance and upgrades for the International Space Station.

During the six-hour, 15-minute spacewalk, the pair worked on a telescoping boom—used to move massive components outside the station—that’s being prepared for replacement next year.

The cosmonauts also installed a new science experiment on the outside of the station and collected a sample from the insulation on the Zvezda service module to check for any biological contamination.

Feb 27 '12
expose-the-light:

Hubble Discovers the First ‘Waterworld,’ an Exoplanet Covered in Water
Really, really hot water


In the Image : Exoplanet ‘Waterworld’ GJ1214b David A. Aguilar (CfA)
The James Webb Space Telescope may someday put Hubble out of  business, but until then NASA’s old standby is still making new  discoveries. Today, that comes to us in the form of the first exoplanet “waterworld”—a water-covered planet shrouded by a dense, steamy atmosphere, the first confirmed planet of its kind.
The planet, known as GJ1214b, was discovered in 2009 by ground-based  observations. But at that time it was difficult to glean much from the  data other than the fact that the planet was indeed out there orbiting a  red dwarf and is roughly 2.7 times Earth’s diameter. But its nearness  to its star—just 1.3 miles away—meant that scientists could be  reasonably sure it is hot there, likely around 450 degrees.
When astronomers from Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics more  recently turned Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 toward GJ1214b while it was  transiting its host star, they were able to analyze the light passing  through the atmosphere for the first time. That analysis suggests that  GJ1214b is swathed in a fairly consistent and dense atmosphere of water  vapor. Further analysis of size and mass (and thus density) further  suggest that GJ1214b contains more water than Earth, and less rock.
That’s not to say GJ1214b is the kind of watery paradise in which you’d want to go sailing, or even face down a cartel of hapless but well-armed future-thugs.  Even if GJ1214b is exactly what the Hubble data suggests it is, it’s  very hot there and the high pressures and temperatures would make for  some conditions vastly different than those on Earth. Superfluid water  and other exotic phenomena likely occur there regularly—things that  would be cool to see from a distance but highly incompatible with life  as we know it on this planet.
The CfA astronomers responsible for the Hubble research speculate  that GJ1214b probably formed further away from its star where water ice  is more plentiful. It then resettled into a closer orbit, becoming the  steamy sphere Hubble sees today. That means at some point this  waterworld would have had to pass through the star’s habitable zone,  though there’s no telling how long it hung around there. More at CfA.
[Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics]

expose-the-light:

Hubble Discovers the First ‘Waterworld,’ an Exoplanet Covered in Water

Really, really hot water
In the Image : Exoplanet ‘Waterworld’ GJ1214b David A. Aguilar (CfA)

The James Webb Space Telescope may someday put Hubble out of business, but until then NASA’s old standby is still making new discoveries. Today, that comes to us in the form of the first exoplanet “waterworld”—a water-covered planet shrouded by a dense, steamy atmosphere, the first confirmed planet of its kind.

The planet, known as GJ1214b, was discovered in 2009 by ground-based observations. But at that time it was difficult to glean much from the data other than the fact that the planet was indeed out there orbiting a red dwarf and is roughly 2.7 times Earth’s diameter. But its nearness to its star—just 1.3 miles away—meant that scientists could be reasonably sure it is hot there, likely around 450 degrees.

When astronomers from Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics more recently turned Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 toward GJ1214b while it was transiting its host star, they were able to analyze the light passing through the atmosphere for the first time. That analysis suggests that GJ1214b is swathed in a fairly consistent and dense atmosphere of water vapor. Further analysis of size and mass (and thus density) further suggest that GJ1214b contains more water than Earth, and less rock.

That’s not to say GJ1214b is the kind of watery paradise in which you’d want to go sailing, or even face down a cartel of hapless but well-armed future-thugs. Even if GJ1214b is exactly what the Hubble data suggests it is, it’s very hot there and the high pressures and temperatures would make for some conditions vastly different than those on Earth. Superfluid water and other exotic phenomena likely occur there regularly—things that would be cool to see from a distance but highly incompatible with life as we know it on this planet.

The CfA astronomers responsible for the Hubble research speculate that GJ1214b probably formed further away from its star where water ice is more plentiful. It then resettled into a closer orbit, becoming the steamy sphere Hubble sees today. That means at some point this waterworld would have had to pass through the star’s habitable zone, though there’s no telling how long it hung around there. More at CfA.

[Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics]